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HISTORY

About

Logan Brae

Logan Brae is a beautifully detailed mid-Victorian Italianate mansion built in the 1870’s for John Busby, his wife Harriet and their ten children


In the later 1800’s and early 1900’s Logan Brae was used as the headquarters of The Bathurst Government Experimental Farm and as accommodation for its students. In 1909 Mr John Meagher MLC bought Logan Brae and donated it to the Sisters of Mercy for use as a formation house and teacher training facility for young Mercy novices. The broader property on which Logan Brae stands became known as ‘St Joseph’s Mount’.
 

Logan Brae, and St Joseph’s Mount was in use as an administration and education centre for the Sisters of Mercy for over 100 years.

 

Designed by Edward Gell (who also designed St Stanislaus College) and built by David Jones (who also built the Bathurst Court House), Logan Brae features poly chrome brick under a hipped iron roof and a grand symmetrical façade. Considered large and opulent for its time Logan Brae has seen very few structural changes since its completion.

The property has been in constant use as a convent residence, administration and education centre for the Sisters of Mercy for over 100 years.

Logan Brae is a beautifully detailed ‘Mid Victorian Italianate Mansion' designed by Edward Gell (who also designed St Stanislaus College) and built in 1877 by David Jones (who also built the Bathurst Court House). With poly chrome brick under a hipped iron roof and symmetrical façade, the house was considered large and opulent for it's time. Very little structural changes have been made to the main part of the house

The Chapel

Built in 1916, the chapel was built with monastic style seating where novices sat in stalls facing each other near the altar. The more senior nuns sat in stalls across the back of the chapel.

The design of the roof and interior is the same as the chapel at Bishop's Court, Seymour Street, Bathurst. All of the windows were originally stained glass, with glazing in some of the side windows later removed and replaced with amber glass to lighten the interior.

The Chapel is 15 metres x 7 metres and 8.5 metres to the apex of the roof which is framed with scissor trusses containing stylised trefoils within the bracing. The apsidal chancel is 5 metres across and contains four stained glass windows presented by Mrs L Mockler in memory of her late husband Lawrence Mockler. The walls are in English bond brickwork with rendered openings, string lines, buttress caps and a crenelated parapet around the chancel and sacristy. The roof is clad with diamond pattern slates with terra-cotta crestings.

34 Busby Street

Bathurst NSW 2795

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